DOUG SPALDING LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY

Bill of materials for 32"x32" wood-fired pizza oven

 

Base slabs

            2 - 2"x6"x12' for form                                         $6.00

            2 - 4'x8'x2” Styrofoam =                                  $50.00

            appropriate amount rebar-1/2” =                      $45.00

            concrete-measure space and compute amount needed-1 80# bag makes 3/4 cubic foot                                                            $200.00

           

Block base

            31 -  full block                                                 $56.00

            4 -  half block                                                   $6.00

            2 bags s–type mortar                                      $15.00

 

Oven materials Infab, in Lewiston Maine

            Floor – 9 square feet regular fire brick

            Sidewalls – 50 regular fire brick

            Front/back walls  - 30 fire brick

            Flue/chimney – 20 fire brick

  You might want to consider a few extra of each kind of brick to account for errors while cutting.

Total – 160 fire brick  @ $2.63                                               $420.00

 

            Arched vault – 76 #1-a arch fire brick

            Front entry arch – 15 #1-a arch fire brick

Total #1 arch brick      91 -  @2.63                                     $240.00

Super 3000 refractory cement – 50#                               $47.00

Noxcrete Castable – 4 bags                                                               $114.00

Rock Wool - $14.00/bag                                               $75.00

"Insblock 19"  - 36 SF insulation between floor and slab $23.00

Diamond blade                                                             $33.00 – when the blade stops cutting and starts just flaming, run it through a cement block a couple of times to ‘dress’ the edge. It’ll then be good for a few more cuts. Just keep doing that until you're done cutting. Don't try to cut all the way through a brick in one pass. Cut in increments of 1/4" to 1/2" cuts until you're trough the brick.

                                Total materials for the basic oven &1200.00

Additional expense will be determined by the outer wall treatment, which will be different for each oven, depending on style preferences of the builder/owner

Second slab

            Remember to leave dump slot for ashes if you decide you want to use it. I found it wasn't that important, as you don't need to clean out the ash very often. The high heat tends to reduce your burned wood to very fine ash.

           

Oven construction

            Lay base brick and mark for outer wall placement.

            Remove floor bricks and cement walls in. After first course of fire brick is down, lay floor back in on bed of sand or insulating board (Insblock 19)

            Finish walls

            Stand arch brick on end on plywood to scribe the arch and skew. If skew works right make of ½ fire brick cut 45° and lay into dry trial. If correct, build arch using 19 arch fire brick and 2 skew brick per course of arch (4 total)

            Mark and saw arch and screw on 1/4” ply as form. Attach uprights to position form correctly.

            Add secondary arch to front as interface to exterior.

 

Oven insulation

    You'll need an appropriate amount of insulation to cover the oven between the oven walls/ceiling and the outer walls. You can use Perlite, Vermiculite or Rock Wool (Mineral Wool). In Maine and New Hampshire I suggest Wallboard Supply, in Hermon, Maine 

 

Consider a sliding or hinged door

I found a really nice antique stove door for $35.00 at Bryant Stove & Music, in Thorndike, Maine

Flue

            Remember to cut 1/3 of 6 arch brick on 1st 2 rows as flue exit.

            Build chimney as the back wall goes up with arched roof. Attach the flue run to the chimney. (2 brick high on edge for sides and one a cross for ceiling of flue?) or castable with 4 bags (see photos of this on the other pages of this site)

 

 

 

 

 

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